Residència Literària Finestres

( 28 )

Nature drove him to step out of his study, demanding that he took a walk through the woods surrounding or along the Camí de Ronda, and he was tortured by the search for the precise words needed to describe them. Nevertheless, he completed a novel and began to mull over some stories.

( 29 )

For the second time in her life she saw a praying mantis that visited her twice: once around the time of her arrival and another near the end of her stay. She completed a novel that “includes spirals, circles and whirls” and later focused her research on another one that “begins amidst bombardments”.

( 30 )

Almost every afternoon, after working on her writing, she practiced Bach’s Cello Suites. Between one thing and another, she also took out her watercolors and dedicated drawings to her favorite Sanià dishes.

( 26 )

She toured the area in search of habanera singers and, seduced by the figure of the lighthouse, she walked to San Sebastián with a book (by María Negroni) about Orfeo in her pocket.

( 27 )

He acted as a film programmer on the third floor of Saniá and shared countless titles of books that he was passionate about. He practiced Tai Chi on the gallery and, despite the cold, he bathed in the sea almost every day.

( 24 )

He never had breakfast because he worked in the solitude of the night. In the afternoons he would go running along the forest road. He was careful not to touch the panic button by accident, and succeeded.

( 25 )

She found a stone chair in Cala Canyers, where she went to meditate every morning. She wrote her diary as if she were Truman Capote and dedicated a poem to him. She donated some of her books to the Sanià library.

( 23 )

Inspired by Goya, the protagonist of his book, he investigated both the flavour and effects of Orujo. He swam almost every day, despite the ferocity of the sea, from Cala Canyers to Cala Sanià. And he experienced (again) what it means to go a month without Wi-Fi.

( 22 )

They wrote so much that they forgot the order of time (one morning began at 2 a.m.). They enjoyed the landscape, the aromas of the food, the noise of the sea and, above all, the “Polsosa” wine from Mas Molla.

( 20 )

She wallpapered her study with the structure of her novel, eulogised Patxaran, and underscored the after-dinner conversations with her good humour. The song “Freed From Desire” haunted her throughout her stay.

( 21 )

She tried to hunt ghosts with her phone’s camera. She drew Tarot for the house and for her colleagues. She kept Ploma at bay, fought off insects, and ran from a robin who snuck into her study.

( 19 )

London, England. She entered the water before the first lights of the day and then locked herself in her monastic study. She worked on a non-fiction book about the crisis of Christianity in modern-day England.

( 18 )

Argentine writer. Woke up at seven in the morning every day without fail to write. Brought alfajores as a gift, took Ploma on walks through the forest and even felt the spirits of the estate.

( 17 )

Mexican writer and poet. Would narrate ancestral dreams at breakfast. Read Selva Almada and distributed her hours of work between stories and novels. Her little dog Lucerito protected the sacred threshold of Sanià.

( 16 )

American writer. Followed one of many Sanià traditions: lying in the hammock and stargazing at three in the morning. Strolled through the gardens at Cap Roig, perfected her Spanish and dove headlong into her third novel.

( 15 )

Spanish writer. Tried to penetrate the mystery of Jeanne Dielman. To avoid the challenging light, he generally wrote until 5:00 or 5:30 AM.

( 14 )

Catalan writer. Shared her creative processes, went diving in Cala Estreta and started drinking mate to finish the last three chapters of her novel.

( 13 )

Colombian writer. Worked on a dreamlike, personal essay. Brought back Caribbean memories from the top floor of Sanià, visited erotic forests, took care of Ploma and sought his roots in Paterno, Italy.

( 12 )

Spanish writer. Finished a manuscript he’d been struggling with for more than seven years.

( 11 )

Spanish writer. She wrote, swam and read almost all of Zambra’s works (she didn’t get to My Documents).

( 10 )

Argentine writer. During her stay, she retraced Truman Capote’s footsteps and nearly brought him back to life.

( 09 )

Catalan writer. He was cold most of the time, but worked tirelessly on three projects: the editing of his second novel; the beginning of the third one and a PhD on love.

( 08 )

Poet from Las Navas del Marqués. She played with her son Nicanor in the sand at Platja Castell, strolled through the forest each day and worked on a long poem, La hora del abejorro.

( 07 )

Catalan poet. Before he began working on his second novel, he would walk the Camí de Ronda in the morning and the evening. He carefully combed through the library at Sanià.

( 06 )

Peruvian writer. “I finally had a room of my own overlooking the sea. That’s where I wrote my Mariateguist novel.”

( 05 )

Catalan writer. She focused on her text La herida erótica, the winner of the 2022 Finestres grant for essays.

( 04 )

English writer. In spite of long hours spent contemplating the sea, he managed to complete a manuscript of over 400 pages and transform it into an excellent book: Pluto’s Got Something to Say.

( 28 )

Nature drove him to step out of his study, demanding that he took a walk through the woods surrounding or along the Camí de Ronda, and he was tortured by the search for the precise words needed to describe them. Nevertheless, he completed a novel and began to mull over some stories.

( 29 )

For the second time in her life she saw a praying mantis that visited her twice: once around the time of her arrival and another near the end of her stay. She completed a novel that “includes spirals, circles and whirls” and later focused her research on another one that “begins amidst bombardments”.

( 30 )

Almost every afternoon, after working on her writing, she practiced Bach’s Cello Suites. Between one thing and another, she also took out her watercolors and dedicated drawings to her favorite Sanià dishes.

( 26 )

She toured the area in search of habanera singers and, seduced by the figure of the lighthouse, she walked to San Sebastián with a book (by María Negroni) about Orfeo in her pocket.

( 27 )

He acted as a film programmer on the third floor of Saniá and shared countless titles of books that he was passionate about. He practiced Tai Chi on the gallery and, despite the cold, he bathed in the sea almost every day.

( 24 )

He never had breakfast because he worked in the solitude of the night. In the afternoons he would go running along the forest road. He was careful not to touch the panic button by accident, and succeeded.

( 25 )

She found a stone chair in Cala Canyers, where she went to meditate every morning. She wrote her diary as if she were Truman Capote and dedicated a poem to him. She donated some of her books to the Sanià library.

( 23 )

Inspired by Goya, the protagonist of his book, he investigated both the flavour and effects of Orujo. He swam almost every day, despite the ferocity of the sea, from Cala Canyers to Cala Sanià. And he experienced (again) what it means to go a month without Wi-Fi.

( 22 )

They wrote so much that they forgot the order of time (one morning began at 2 a.m.). They enjoyed the landscape, the aromas of the food, the noise of the sea and, above all, the “Polsosa” wine from Mas Molla.

( 20 )

She wallpapered her study with the structure of her novel, eulogised Patxaran, and underscored the after-dinner conversations with her good humour. The song “Freed From Desire” haunted her throughout her stay.

( 21 )

She tried to hunt ghosts with her phone’s camera. She drew Tarot for the house and for her colleagues. She kept Ploma at bay, fought off insects, and ran from a robin who snuck into her study.

( 19 )

London, England. She entered the water before the first lights of the day and then locked herself in her monastic study. She worked on a non-fiction book about the crisis of Christianity in modern-day England.

( 18 )

Argentine writer. Woke up at seven in the morning every day without fail to write. Brought alfajores as a gift, took Ploma on walks through the forest and even felt the spirits of the estate.

( 17 )

Mexican writer and poet. Would narrate ancestral dreams at breakfast. Read Selva Almada and distributed her hours of work between stories and novels. Her little dog Lucerito protected the sacred threshold of Sanià.

( 16 )

American writer. Followed one of many Sanià traditions: lying in the hammock and stargazing at three in the morning. Strolled through the gardens at Cap Roig, perfected her Spanish and dove headlong into her third novel.

( 15 )

Spanish writer. Tried to penetrate the mystery of Jeanne Dielman. To avoid the challenging light, he generally wrote until 5:00 or 5:30 AM.

( 14 )

Catalan writer. Shared her creative processes, went diving in Cala Estreta and started drinking mate to finish the last three chapters of her novel.

( 13 )

Colombian writer. Worked on a dreamlike, personal essay. Brought back Caribbean memories from the top floor of Sanià, visited erotic forests, took care of Ploma and sought his roots in Paterno, Italy.

( 12 )

Spanish writer. Finished a manuscript he’d been struggling with for more than seven years.

( 11 )

Spanish writer. She wrote, swam and read almost all of Zambra’s works (she didn’t get to My Documents).

( 10 )

Argentine writer. During her stay, she retraced Truman Capote’s footsteps and nearly brought him back to life.

( 09 )

Catalan writer. He was cold most of the time, but worked tirelessly on three projects: the editing of his second novel; the beginning of the third one and a PhD on love.

( 08 )

Poet from Las Navas del Marqués. She played with her son Nicanor in the sand at Platja Castell, strolled through the forest each day and worked on a long poem, La hora del abejorro.

( 07 )

Catalan poet. Before he began working on his second novel, he would walk the Camí de Ronda in the morning and the evening. He carefully combed through the library at Sanià.

( 06 )

Peruvian writer. “I finally had a room of my own overlooking the sea. That’s where I wrote my Mariateguist novel.”

( 05 )

Catalan writer. She focused on her text La herida erótica, the winner of the 2022 Finestres grant for essays.

( 04 )

English writer. In spite of long hours spent contemplating the sea, he managed to complete a manuscript of over 400 pages and transform it into an excellent book: Pluto’s Got Something to Say.

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